This crispy-chewy, SUPER EASY bacon and onion Flammkcuchen recipe is popular by the names of Elsässer Flammkuchen or Tarte Flambée. My favorite type of Flammkuchen originated in the once-German region of Alsace in France (in German ‘Elsass’), hence the name Elsässer Flammkuchen. This flatbread is a quickly made snack, appetizer, or entrée. It’s common to eat a whole Flammkuchen by yourself (and I prefer not to share, either!).

 Flammkuchen

About this Recipe

flammkuchen recipe tarte flambee dirndl kitchen

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How to Make Flammkuchen

Flammkuchen is super popular throughout Germany and making Flammkuchen is surprisingly simple! Knead the dough ingredients until you have a workable, smooth dough (you may need to add more water or flour). Whisk the sour cream and whipping cream ingredients for the sauce. Slice up some onion and bacon and bake. Und fertig (and done)! All you need are the following ingredients and tools. Few ingredients mean the better the quality, the better the results. Here are a few notes:

  • All-Purpose Flour. I would not substitute with whole wheat flour or whole grain flour in this recipe as it tends to overpower the classic flavors of the other ingredients. However, you can easily substitute with all-purpose gluten-free flour to make this recipe gluten-free.
  • Olive Oil. Just some good ol’ Extra Virgin Olive Oil is great in this recipe. Avocado oil is another of my current favorites to use.
  • Sea Salt. I use Himalayan Pink Salt for its added health benefits.
  • Sour Cream. Plain, full-fat sour cream is what I use.
  • Heavy Whipping Cream. Use the real stuff.
  • Gruyère Cheese (optional). This creamy, aged Swiss cheese adds such a refined rustic note without being too overpowering. I get mine at Costco. I love this non-traditional addition!
  • Onion. You’ll use a whole yellow onion for this recipe that you’ll slice thinly and layer on top for the sour cream topping.
  • Bacon. I get my thick-cut bacon at the Whole Foods meat counter as I LOVE IT! The Blackberry Serrano kind is my favorite and it’s not spicy at all. It makes perfect little lardons (mini bacon strips) or small dice.

flammkuchen recipe tarte flambee dirndl kitchen

Where is Elsässer Flammkuchen from?

The name gives you the biggest hint. This particular type of Flammkuchen recipe is from the French region of Alsace (or Elsass in German). This disputed region at times belonged to Germany and is close to the German border. You’ll notice lots of German architecture and German language there and I have loved the many trips to the beautiful Straßburg (or Strasbourg in French) growing up in Trier, Germany! Alsace or Elsass is now part of a combined region called ‘Grand Est’ in France and Strasbourg was named the capital of that region in 2016. Flammkuchen is also extremely popular in many varieties (I linked a few below) all throughout Germany, but Elsässer Flammkuchen is by far the best known type. You don’t have to travel to Strasbourg or Germany to eat Elsässer Flammkuchen though. You can easily make it at home using a few ingredients and it will taste just as good as if you were in France!

flammkuchen recipe tarte flambee dirndl kitchen
flammkuchen recipe tarte flambee dirndl kitchen

A Viez-Sprudel Cocktail Pairing

Viez-Sprudel (German apple wine mixed with sparkling wine) would be my go-to drink pairing for Flammkuchen. However, since apple wine is basically nowhere to be found in the US, I have experimented just a bit to make this simple Apple Spritzer cocktail inspired by that exact combination. The Schönauer Apple Liqueur (made from real German apples of course) adds just the right amount of sweetness and apple flavor to this drink.

Over ice, combine 1 ounce of vodka with 1 ounce of Schönauer Apfel and 2 ounces of sparkling water. Give it a couple of stirs, then garnish with an apple slice and fresh herbs (optional). Prost! Find out where Schönauer is available by visiting this link.

flammkuchen recipe tarte flambee dirndl kitchen
flammkuchen recipe tarte flambee dirndl kitchen

FLammkuchen Essentials


Even More

Flammkuchen Recipes

To TRY

White asparagus and cambozola Flammkuchen on wood board

Spring Flammkuchen

Summer Flammkuchen ready to be shared

Summer Flammkuchen

fall Flammkuchen recipe dirndl kitchen

Fall Flammkuchen

Next Up:

Valentine’s Käsekuchen!

Thank you for stopping by my blog! Please stay awhile, drool over some delicious German food, leave some feedback and ideas in the comment section below, and subscribe to receive weekly emails with new recipes! Next is one of my favorite recipes! Simple, crust-less German cheesecakes made quickly in German weck jars! They’re perfect as individual desserts for Valentine’s Day!

flammkuchen recipe tarte flambee dirndl kitchen
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Flammkuchen Recipe (Tarte Flambée)

This crispy-chewy, SUPER EASY bacon and onion flatbread is popular by the names of Elsässer Flammkuchen or Tarte Flambée. My favorite type of Flammkuchen originated in the once-German region of Alsace in France (in German 'Elsass'), hence the name Elsässer Flammkuchen. This flatbread is a quickly made snack, appetizer, or entrée. It's common to eat a whole Flammkuchen by yourself (and I prefer not to share, either!).
Prep Time15 mins
Cook Time20 mins
Total Time35 mins
Course: Appetizer, Baking, Dinner, Entertaining, Lunch, Main Course, Snack
Cuisine: Elsass, French, German
Keyword: Alsace Flammkuchen Recipe, Alsace Tarte Flambee Recipe, Bacon and Onion Tart Recipe, Classic Flammkuchen Recipe, Classic Tarte Flambee Recipe, Elsässer Flammkuchen Recipe, Flammkuchen Recipe, German Bacon and Onion Flatbread Recipe, German Flatbread Recipe, Simple German Pizza Recipe, Tarte Flambee Recipe
Servings: 1 Flammkuchen
Calories: 2272kcal

Ingredients

Flammkuchen Dough

Flammkuchen Toppings

  • 200 grams sour cream
  • 60 milliliters heavy whipping cream
  • 200 grams yellow onion about 1 large onion, cut into thin rings
  • 100 grams bacon thick cut, cut into small strips (lardons) or dice
  • salt and pepper
  • 50 grams gruyère cheese optional

Instructions

  • Preheat the oven to the highest temperature (usually 500° Fahrenheit or 260° Celsius) and if you have a pizza stone, feel free to use it. Baking it on a baking sheet covered with parchment paper works fine as well.

Make The Dough

  • Mix together the dough ingredients. If it’s still sticky, add some more flour until you are able to work it with your hands. If it's too dry, add some more water.
    200 grams flour, 2 Tablespoon Olive Oil, ½ teaspoon salt, ½ cup water

Prepare the Toppings

  • Mix together the sour cream and heavy whipping cream. I personally LOVE to add in some shredded gruyère for an added rustic flavor, which is totally optional and not as traditional. Season to taste with some salt and pepper.
    200 grams sour cream, 60 milliliters heavy whipping cream, 50 grams gruyère cheese, salt and pepper

Assemble & Bake

  • Roll out the dough thinly and spread out the sour cream mixture on it using a spoon.
  • Evenly distribute the onion rings and cut up bacon (I like lardons, which are thin strips or diced bacon for Flammkuchen).
    200 grams yellow onion, 100 grams bacon
  • Bake for about 15-20 minutes or until the bacon starts becoming crispy and the crust starts becoming golden. Feel free to garnish with chopped, fresh herbs like chives and parsley, if available. Guten Appetit!

Notes

While typically in Germany one Flammkuchen serves one person, this one easily serves 2. You could also make this recipe into 2 smaller Flammkuchen instead, so each person can enjoy their individual ones.

Nutrition

Calories: 2272kcal | Carbohydrates: 180g | Protein: 56g | Fat: 148g | Saturated Fat: 64g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 14g | Monounsaturated Fat: 60g | Trans Fat: 1g | Cholesterol: 307mg | Sodium: 2194mg | Potassium: 1072mg | Fiber: 9g | Sugar: 15g | Vitamin A: 2643IU | Vitamin C: 17mg | Calcium: 850mg | Iron: 11mg

Sponsored Content and Affiliate Links Disclosure

I received compensation from Marussia Beverages in exchange for writing this post. Although this post is sponsored, all opinions, thoughts and recipes are my own. This post contains affiliate links, which means that I may be compensated if you click certain links.